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Fiber Reinforced Plastic Armor Tutorial by Wilkowen Fiber Reinforced Plastic Armor Tutorial by Wilkowen
This is a simple tutorial illustrating my favorite technique for cosplay armor and props. The example shown here is an armor design from Twilight Princess, basic plate armor consisting of simple curves and raised design elements.
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:iconsageoftwilight56:
Sageoftwilight56 Featured By Owner Jul 24, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
Really cool tutorial, thanks!


Also, That cat is precioussss
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:iconwhitedemon19:
WhiteDemon19 Featured By Owner Mar 15, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
THERE IS A CAT!!!!!Bunny Emoji-42 (Awww) [V2]  on the 1st picture 
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:iconmomijizukamori:
Momijizukamori Featured By Owner Oct 19, 2013
Interesting idea! I hadn't thought of using polyester resin with materials other than fiberglass.

One note, though - polyester resin and body filler should be used with a respirator, as they give off toxic vapors. You're probably fine once or twice, but using it for long periods of time or repeated exposure can cause neurological damage.
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:iconwilkowen:
Wilkowen Featured By Owner Oct 21, 2013
I think that a lot of the concern about using these chemicals at home comes from the misconception that the same exposure hazards found in industrial applications also apply to DIY projects.  Even so, I will probably remove the statement that a respirator is not needed for this small project, and just let folks decide for themselves.
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:iconmomijizukamori:
Momijizukamori Featured By Owner Dec 8, 2013
True - a lot of stuff depends on degree of exposure (ie, frequent for industrial uses, more variable for people doing DIY stuff - I know I didn't have what would qualify as 'proper ventilation' when I did resin work, though). In general it's probably better to err on the side of caution - and respirator filters are the only thing that'll block out how awful the resin smells *g*
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:iconwilkowen:
Wilkowen Featured By Owner Apr 8, 2013
I have used 72 and 72F (fusible) and both work well. If you look closely at the fusible, you will see that the adhesive is not a continuous layer, but lots of tiny dots. There is still space for the resin to work its way in.
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:iconcelyddon:
Celyddon Featured By Owner Apr 6, 2013  Hobbyist Artisan Crafter
Huh. I have a question. Would this work with fusible interfacing? I know that the fusibles already have resin fabricated into them, so not sure how that would affect the absorption of the fiberglass resin. I have an entire bolt of the stuff I'd love to requisition for fiberglassing, if it works.
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:iconwilkowen:
Wilkowen Featured By Owner Apr 8, 2013
I have used 72 and 72F (fusible) and both work well. If you look closely at the fusible, you will see that the adhesive is not a continuous layer, but lots of tiny dots. There is still space for the resin to work its way in.
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:iconcelyddon:
Celyddon Featured By Owner Apr 8, 2013  Hobbyist Artisan Crafter
Sweet! I've cut four layers' worth of the stuff to try out on Friday. Crossing my fingers and hope it works well. I'm running out of time. :(
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:iconwilkowen:
Wilkowen Featured By Owner Apr 9, 2013
Just thought I'd mention that if you are substituting interfacing for glass cloth to go over a separate base, you'd want the interfacing to be a similar weight as the cloth. 72 is heavy stuff that best serves as BOTH the base and the composite (such as in the above tutorial). Hope that makes sense.
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